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Yen Press

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 9)

In this volume, we return to Pariya and Umar’s story. Pariya’s family is finishing rebuilding their house and the family’s business, and so Pariya’s father is starting to move faster on her marriage negotiations. Though her friendship with Kamola and other village girls is slowly sharpening her social skills, Pariya still frequently stumbles over her words, especially when it comes to Umar. An opportunity arises for them to run an errand together to the next town over, but they have trouble on the way back and are forced to stay the night in a stranger’s house. Though the reason is innocent enough, the fact that it happened may very well be enough for their engagement to be called off. Can they keep their stopover a secret from the rest of their village?

This volume also featured short stories about other characters, such as Amir, Sherine and Anis, and the twins Laila and Leyli.

The more this story progresses, the more I appreciate the wide variety of female characters within it. Pariya’s arc is turning into one of the most interesting and satisfying. She is strong, independent, and possesses other masculine qualities about her. But, she’s also very shy and fumbles over her words, sometimes to her detriment as others often mistake her meaning. She is learning to be more open and communicate clearly with who she hopes to be her future spouse – and that’s not an easy thing to do at the best of times. The main thing is, we see her trying and bettering herself in a way that is organic and never feels forced.

Though we do get this vast array of women who are very different, they are all supportive of each other. Amir and Kamola, along with some other village girls, offer to help Pariya with her bridal sewing once it becomes apparent she needs help. That’s amazing! That’s something that the world needs more of!

As ever, looking forward to the next volume.

-Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 9). 2017.

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 5)

The twins, Leila and Leily, are finally getting married! There is so much to do and prepare: their wedding attire, the feast for the guests, and more! The day approaches, but as custom dictates, the brides cannot participate in any of the festivities. They’re instead expected to sit quietly and await their grooms. If they thought snagging husbands was hard, they’re in for a trial on their own wedding day! Of course, Mr. Smith is there, taking notes and asking questions on every aspect of the wedding festivities, but it will soon be time for him to resume his journey to Ankara. Amir has taken in an injured hawk and is trying to nurse it back to health. She worries it won’t be able to fly again, but Karluk is worried the hawk is getting more attention from his wife than he is! How does he navigate these feelings of jealousy?

So far, I haven’t minded that the series is in black and white – but man, with this volume, I really wish it was. The wedding festivities would have been amazing to see in color… I’m sure it would have been a riot of reds, yellows, and whites – cheerful colors. It is fun to imagine, don’t get me wrong ;D Mori’s drawing is so detailed and precise that I could almost smell the food being prepared. The art of this manga is so sensual and transports you to another place simply by looking at a panel.

I am glad we circled back to Amir and Karluk’s relationship in this volume. There is a beautiful chapter where Amir narrates a day – one day – in their life together, yet it feels like a snapshot of their whole married life thus far. Being engaged to be married myself… it hit a little hard. I feel like we’re digging a little more into the “meat” of the story here, with further character development, and the deepening of Amir and Karluk’s relationship. As ever, looking forward to the next volume!

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 5). 2013.

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 1)

I mentioned in a previous post that I’m not really a fan of manga – mostly because I can’t finish a manga to save my life! But I think I may have finally found one here 😉

Amir is a young woman who has been sent to marry her betrothed and live with his family. She’s in for a surprise – Karluk, the young man, is eight years younger than she is! Amir cheerfully takes it in stride. Life in nineteenth century Asia isn’t easy, but the family gets by. They have strong bonds with one another, and Amir is quickly accepted and loved by the Eihon family as if she was one of their own. For twelve-year-old Karluk, it’s a little strange to be married to a woman who’s twenty, but Amir is optimistic, kind, and knows how to hunt and ride horseback. Their bond is something like brother and sister, but could it go deeper? However, Amir’s family wants to take her back… they say that Amir wasn’t the one they meant to send! How can the Eihon family possibly give up one of their own?

Atmosphere is the name of the game with this manga. The art is simply stunning. The amount of detail in the clothing, rugs, and landscapes is overwhelming – in the best way! I found myself stopping and lingering over one page for minutes at a time, multiple times. You’re transported to central Asia in the nineteenth century with ease. Just look at this panel of Amir and Karluk sitting together!

vcmnpr0

Isn’t it beautiful? ❤

There are a few family members who make appearances, but there is thankfully a family tree in the back in case you get confused. All the characters, Amir most of all, are charming and absolutely lovable. I’d keep coming back for the art alone, but the characters sealed the deal for me. I can’t remember the last time I said this for a manga, but I am so looking forward to the next volume!!!

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 1). 2009.

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