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Stitches

I loved this graphic novel memoir! Some books really call to you because of past life experiences and I could relate to the experiences in the story because I was raised by an extremely angry father myself, so while our bios were completely different, I could connect at some level.

Author David Small was raised in Detroit with a taunting older brother, a father who was a radiologist plus an angry and repressed mother. Growing up in the image conscious 1950’s, David was a sickly child who tried to make the best of his dysfunctional upbringing by escaping into his art. At age eleven a growth began to grow on his neck, but his parents didn’t get him surgery for three more years, until it had metastasized into cancer. They kept the fact that it was cancer from him, and after he discovered the truth he was left with additional emotional scars in addition to the physical stitches and loss of half of his vocal cords.

The mother in this book was so very unlikable, and while Small didn’t portray his father in the same way, the fact that his father allowed the family to exist like that made him equally culpable. Such horrible undercurrents were running through that family over the years, and the choice for the parents not to tell their son he had cancer was inexcusable. Later he discovered that his mother was a lesbian and had significant health issues herself. Pair that with a toxic marriage, it’s no surprise that David and his brother were doomed to an unhappy childhood. However, the ending showed that with proper help from a therapist and finding supportive friends, an unhappy childhood does not prevent you from a successful and happy future.

His illustrations were so well done, with the reader easily seeing the family resemblances through the generations, and his eyes/face moving between child and teen. The drawings were all in black and white, which I thought focused you more on the narrative than on potentially distracting colors.  I enjoyed the Alice in Wonderland theme throughout, from him playing Alice as a child, to the very obvious White Rabbit therapist analogy. Of course, I enjoyed him finding peace and a passion/vocation that would move him away from his dysfunctional family. Page 302 made me tear up, seeing him as a young adult finally receiving the affirmation he deserved.

-Nancy

Small, David. Stitches. 2009.

The Name of the Game & A Family Matter

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Awhile back I read the classic The Contract With God Trilogy by Will Eisner, which is considered among the first graphic novels written. A fellow blogger, Joshua @ White Tower Musings, read my post and suggested several other Eisner novels for me to read. As I enjoy his thoughtful and well written posts about “the significance of various works of literature, the authors that create them, and some effort to understand correlations between great writing and contemporary events”, I searched out these lesser known works, based off his recommendations.  I’m glad I did.

I gobbled up The Name of the Game, as I was quickly swept into the inter-generational family saga that spanned 100 years. Supposedly based off Eisner’s wife’s family, the story shows how class and appearances trump love and common decency. The Arnheim family, who are of German-Jewish descent, establish themselves in New York City and are considered a leading family in the social establishment soon after the Civil War.  As such they feel they need to further their personal and business connections by making a good marriage for their eldest son Conrad, the heir apparent to the clothing empire. Looking outside the city, they settle on the daughter of a well respected Ohio banking family, and arrange for her to meet their son. While she is smitten, he is not, and the resulting marriage is an unhappy one due to his wandering eye. The marriage ends when she dies in childbirth, and their daughter is sent  to live with her Ohio grandparents. Conrad them marries a much younger woman who is very glamorous, but their marriage is based on lies, and ends up being for show only. While they eventually have a daughter themselves, the family is only worried about appearances. The family name buffers their finances through the Depression, and others fall by the wayside due to Conrad’s ruthless ways, and the Arnheim’s continue to build their wealth. Conrad’s second daughter Rosie grows to adulthood in the counter culture 60’s and rejects the status of her family, and marries a struggling poet. Her husband Aron’s parents are thrilled to be related by marriage to the powerful Arnheim’s, and their status increases due to this connection. While Rosie felt she was breaking out of the confine’s of her upbringing, and embraces her more religious in-laws, Aron ends up joining Conrad’s firm and drags her back into the society she was anxious to escape from. Eisner’s compelling book show how class and culture can mix into a toxic sludge, and the length people go to keep up appearances can strangle out the best of intentions.

A Family Matter was a compact book, and painted a dysfunctional family with broad strokes. It had the misfortune of being read last, so to me it felt like a retread of past stories. Five adult siblings gather to celebrate their father’s 90th birthday, but we find that all of them have their own interests at heart, or have warped relationships with their father and each other. We are introduced to all the siblings in their home environments and also see vignettes of their younger lives and their troubled interactions with their father. Incest, blackmail, marital cheating, abandonment and embezzlement all come into effect in this morality play. The story had a timeless feel, so a panel with a cell phone was jarring, as much of his work is evocative of the 50’s era.  The term “A family matter” is hammered in, as to show the familial ties that bind these flawed relatives together. No one has any truly redeeming qualities, and as for the inheritance and status they seek, it is overshadowed by their greed and jealousy. The ending came as no surprise, and the narrative pauses as you know their base instincts will take over, once the shock wears off.

While Eisner can rightly be considered a giant in the comics industry, his work is not without some criticisms. After reading these books, plus A Contract With God, I noticed he has some “types” that he falls back on again and again. There are few to no regular looking characters, for women are either the seductress, the plump mothering type or the the sour matriarch. Men are the good looking blonde never-do-well, the bearded ethnic older man or the bumbling and balding portly man. Families are hard to ascertain by physical similarities, for they go straight from young and thin to old and matronly, and parents and children look nothing alike. I’ve also noticed continuity errors when he spans many years such as when the ages of the characters and what has transpired don’t match. I do have to wonder about his own personal family dynamics, as many of his stories center around maladjusted and broken families.

There are more books by Eisner that I hope to read in the future such as The Plot and The Spirit. Eisner was a pioneer in the graphic novels world, and his timeless pieces show that he was a master storyteller.

-Nancy

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The Contract With God Trilogy

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Eisner, Will. The Contract With God Trilogy. 1978.

This epic book is considered the first graphic novel and was written by Will Eisner, whom the Eisner Awards are named after in honor of all his contributions to the world of comics.

Part I: A Contract With God– Four stories make up this Part I, all which are linked thematically with recurring issues of disillusionment and classism.  The namesake story A Contract with God is about a devout Jewish man who gives up his faith after the death of his young daughter and how he feels that all his good works and that the religious contract he had written earlier were in vain. The Street Singer and The Super detail repugnant people and the misfortune that befalls them both.  Cookalein weaves the stories of several characters staying at a blue collar resort in the Catskill Mountains, who are all striving to better themselves. This last story was fascinating and gives a peek into a forgotten chapter of how the lower middle class vacationed.

Part II: A Life Force– Much of the story centers around Jacob Shtarkah and his Jewish family as they all yearn for a better future. Within one family’s experiences you see a microcosm of what was happening in the larger world during the Depression and years leading up to WWII. Jacob wishes for more and struggles with an existential search as the eleven stories reveal the hopes and dreams of many in the Dropsie neighborhood.

Part III: Dropsie Avenue– My first thought on finishing this segment that it was the classic children’s book The Little House, written by Virginia Lee Burton in 1942, on steroids. The story begins it’s 100 year arc in 1870 in the Bronx when there were still Dutch farms. After a few decades the farms have given way to an elegant neighborhood on Dropsie Avenue. The neighborhood has some newly rich Irish immigrants move in, and then some German immigrants. Both endure discrimination before leaving. The neighborhood begins a slow decline, with tenement buildings replacing the once stately family homes, until Dropsie Avenue is quite city like.  The Depression hits the area hard, and a new wave of Italian immigrants move it, and slum landlords let the tenements go to ruin. While responsible residents remain,  the years pass by with much social upheaval, until the neighborhood is razed for a new housing development. Then begins the cycle again, with a rather depressing epilogue.

Each story can stand alone, but they all fit together as a whole for they compliment one another in tone, under the same thematic motif of cultural and religious identity. The pictures are drawn in black and white with sepia overtones, and Eisner varied his page design to great effect in his storytelling. The cityscapes were well done, but the people he depicted veered between realistic portrayals and caricatures that were culturally insensitive. Ultimately, the saga of death and rebirth makes this a classic story that deserves all the praise it has received. It was a landmark book, that forever changed how a story could be told. 

-Nancy

* Other excellent Eisner books are The Name of the Game & A Family Matter

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