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The Great Chris Debate! Part 4: Chris Pine

This week, Michael of My Comic Relief, Kalie of Just Dread-full, Kathleen, and I went head to head – trying to decide which cinematic superhero Chris is best! Michael supported Chris Pratt, Kalie choose Chris Hemsworth and Kathleen went with Chris Evans. All three shared heartfelt but misguided treatises as to the superiority of their Chris. While all three are excellent writers, they all fell short (and they secretly know it). Clearly the best was saved for last, which quite obviously is Chris Pine.

To say that the public is blessed with such four outstanding Chrises is an understatement. People come in with their own preconceived notions of what they find attractive, sexy and funny. All of the Chrises fit into those categories, but it takes a truly superior Chris to rise above the rest. So let’s wrap this up for once and for all, as I prove my Chris is best.

As if we needed an introduction to the best of the Chrises, but here it is, announcing it himself:

Continue reading “The Great Chris Debate! Part 4: Chris Pine”

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Star Trek Continues: To Boldly Go

Star Trek Continues has come to an end. This webseries was a true labor of love from all involved, especially Vic Mignogna, who created and starred in this wonderful tribute series. If this blog was on paper, you would notice blotch marks- from my tears, now that it is over!!

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Vic Mignogna who payed homage to Captain Kirk, but never fell into a cheesy William Shatner impersonation.

Episodes 10 and 11 were a two parter, which really was essential to give them enough time to adequately wrap up the series. As the episode begins, Captain Kirk is reflective as the five year mission is coming to an end, and he mourns the crew members that have died under his command. He hopes for a smooth end to the journey, but is directed to enter Romulan space by Star Fleet Command. He, Spock and a red shirt beam down to a planet to investigate a scientific outpost.  They beam aboard the lone scientist still there, not knowing her secret abilities, plus the Vulcan that attacked them there. Spock then takes this opportunity to secretly send a message to a Romulan commander that he had a connection to from The Enterprise Incident. The commander is played by Amy Rydell, the daughter of TOS original actress Joanne Linville, and it is amazing how Rydell looks likes her mother.

The scientist Lana proves to be hiding her motives, and her connection to the Vulcan is revealed. Turns out that that the scientists are now ESPers, who have developed the ability to read minds and have powerful new telekinetic powers. Drunk on her newfound power, Lana plans to rendezvous with the others ESPers on the USS Congo, a ship that they took over near the galactic barrier. The Enterprise crew take action to thwart the renegades who plan on conquering mere humans with their more evolved powers. Some crew members make the ultimate sacrifice, and their losses are heartfelt, as they were integral characters on the show.

The Enterprise crew ultimately limp into space dock, victorious, but at a high cost. I was glad for the lengthy finale, which tied up plot lines and gave it a poignant conclusion. I loved the touches of continuity that they established to build a bridge from this supposed end of the five year mission and the first movie. There was a reference that the doctor had a daughter that he hadn’t seen in years, there was a joke about how the uniforms would be changing soon and about the pilot program of having a counselor on board which is a connection to TNG crew.

I do have a significant complaint though- if you have read any of my previous posts about this series (Episodes 1-6, Episodes 7-8, Episode 9) you know that I really liked the actress Kim Springer who beautifully portrayed Lt. Nyota Uhura. I complained that she (plus Sulu, Chekov & Scotty) was not given enough character development due to the series giving more screen time to the big three and actress Michele Specht who played Counselor Elise McKennah. Unfortunately, that happened again. I truly feel bad harping on that, because Specht is a fine actress, but as a true fan of TOS, I wanted the core seven to be featured, not a newcomer.  While Uhura had two significant moments of helping in the last mission, it wasn’t enough.  Obviously, I love this webseries, but this issue was a constant thorn in my side.

This isn’t even from this episode, but Kim Springer/Uhura is in it!

This was a fantastic webseries that truly felt like canon to TOS. The replication of the sets and uniforms were outstanding, and the guest stars that often had a Star Trek or other sci-fi connection helped elevate the episodes. When ever I find a new Trekkie fan I always share this series with them, as it was a perfect continuation of the original television show and felt incredibly authentic. I am sad the series is over, but can enjoy watching reruns of it, as I have enjoyed watching and then rewatching other Trek episodes. I certainly hope to see these fine actors and actresses involved in other projects.

Until then…live long and prosper, my friends!

-Nancy

The Autobiography of James T Kirk

I am a big fan of the Star Trek universe, so when I saw this book come highly recommended by a Goodreads friend, with whom I have many similar reading tastes, I snapped it up.  A description from Amazon says it is the “first officially produced in-universe biography of the legendary and iconic Star Trek character, Captain Kirk“. Written as if it were the memoirs of Captain Kirk, I was prepared to love it.

Sometimes we read a book at just the right time in our lives, so the book speaks to us, as if it were written for you alone. Other times due to timing, a book is read at the absolute wrong time, so you end up hating the book. Unfortunately, this book falls into the later category for me.  Let’s find out why!

The book starts out promisingly, with Kirk recounting his childhood in Iowa with his parents and older brother Sam, to the book’s “editor” David A Goodman. It proceeds through his first time off planet with his mother, then through his early years of Starfleet Academy. We meet many of the people who will play a part in his later missions, for several of them tie in with school and his first two ship assignments. Thus, the narrative takes official Star Trek canon and builds around it.

Once we hit the Enterprise years, the book came to a screeching halt. Kirk’s recollections lurched from one episode to another, recapping what we know happened in the tv show and later in the movies. Spock and McCoy were barely mentioned, and their friendship did not ring true, even with their foreword and afterwards bookends.  Then the other important quartet of Uhura, Scotty, Sulu and Chekhov were also all but ignored in this supposed memoir. There was so sense of unity or teamwork among the Enterprise staff, much less the family he left behind. Even the Khan stories lacked power.

Now let’s talk about the ladies. Kirk is known as a swashbuckling ladies man, but in this story he is a petulant man child. He is callous to his first love at the academy and is a complete ass and a deadbeat dad to Carol and their son David. There is no mention of his marriage to Miramanee, whom I felt was one of his true loves, and doesn’t mention the kiss with Uhura. The largest story goes his romance with Edith during a mission he went to the Earth’s past. He moons over her death, and then slights other women. Even with Carol and David come back into his life years later he doesn’t muster much excitement or love for them. When David dies, he isn’t heartbroken and dismisses Carol, never to see her again.

I believe there are three glaring reasons why I didn’t like the book. One- my eldest just started college, and I miss him terribly. I was angry at Starfleet for making family life basically impossible. Family relationships were torn asunder by the long absences, and the choices people made if they wanted to accept a promotion. Second- I recently had a negative experience when someone else’s bad decision affected me. So Kirk’s many decisions through out his career, where others were collateral damage to his ego, infuriated me. Thirdly- the filling in around canon didn’t seem authentic to me. While it was approved (so I assume the new info is canon too now), it all seemed fake and wooden. I recently read Superman: American Alien which did the same thing, but that story filled in the gaps of Clark Kent’s growing up years in a very believable way.

So while I hated this version of Kirk, I am going to do what many fans do when faced with problematic story lines or conflicting data- I’m going to pretend it doesn’t exist. If I can forget about Spock’s brother or how Klingon’s first looked when we met them in TOS, I can forget about Goodman’s Kirk. Instead I shall remember the blustery but fun William Shatner version that started this whole Trek phenomenon.  Live long and prosper, my friends.

-Nancy

Star Trek Continues: What Ships Are For

Star Trek Continues is a homage to Star Trek TOS, and this web series’s ninth episode is the best yet! This episode was so very true to TOS, that it was eerie. While past installments have been an accurate recreation of the first series, this episode felt like it truly belonged in the canon of the original series.

The opening scene begins with some light hearted banter between the senior staff, with some expository dialogue to set up the scenario of sending the ship to a planet to help a never before contacted society.

The big three beam down, and are surprised that the world is only in shades of black and white- there is no color. They are soon greeted by two political ambassadors, one of whom is the guest star John de Lancie, who famously played the alien Q in the TNG, DS9 & Voyager series. The married ambassadors share that their Hyalini civilization is in peril, thus their distress call to the Federation. A radiation disease is killing off the population, one of the symptoms being that generations of the planet’s inhabitants have been color blind.

Doctor McCoy needs to take one of the Hyalini to the Enterprise so he can study the radiation poisoning and find a cure for it. Kirk is pleased that it is Sekara, a beautiful woman who is close friends with the ambassadors. After beaming up, with her sun’s radiation no longer affecting her, she is shocked to discover color. Initially overwhelmed by this, purple haired Sekara soon adjusts and she and Kirk manage to find some sexy time in his quarters.

During this time another alien race, the Ambicians, are discovered trying to land on the Hyalini home planet. Kirk and his crew are shocked that the seemingly peaceful Hyalini shoot at the Ambicians, and that they profess such hatred for them. Further research into the matter shows that many Ambicians have actually settled on the planet, but have been able to escape detection for their purple hair and different skin tone have not been noticed by the color blind inhabitants. Wait…doesn’t Sekura who is Hyalini have purple hair? What???

Kirk lets Sekura know the truth and she is horrified- what will her former friends and loved ones think of her once the medicine cures everyone of their radiation poisoning and color blindness? She shares her fear, “Their eyes will change but their hearts may not.” Kirk and Spock beam down to speak again the ambassadors and political council, and Kirk confronts them on their prejudices.

The obvious parallels with this story is our current political climate and issues we face with immigration. Star Trek has always been at it’s best when episodes make us confront our moral, racial and political bias. The dialogue between the Captain and Ambassador Galisti is poignant, and both make valid points. However,  Kirk’s arguments are the better of the two, with Galisti echoing some uncomfortable rhetoric we have heard out of President Trump’s speeches. Ultimately Galisti discovers the truth about Sekura and his beloved wife, and he and the other Hyalini are faced with a moral dilemma. The Enterprise has given this civilization the tools they need, now it is up to them to face an uncertain future and try to broker a peace between the two races.

In my previous posts, that cover Episodes 1-6 and then 7-8, I complain that Uhura, Sulu, Scotty & Chekov get minimal screen time, and AGAIN, this was the case. I am including some pictures of Kim Stringer who wonderfully plays Uhura, just because I think she deserves it. Love her! What could have been a perfect episode, was marred by this continued omission.

In conclusion, I was (mostly) thrilled with this episode. It saddens me to realize that just as this web-series is at it’s strongest, it only has two more episodes before they are done for good, as to avoid any conflicts of interest with CBS and the upcoming Star Trek Discovery. I look forward to the remaining two episodes and hope that they are as strong as this one.

Live long and prosper.

-Nancy

*The featured top picture is made by Star Trek fan and amazing artist, Gaz Williams.

Two beautiful Uhura’s- Kim Stringer and the classic Nichelle Nichols! ♥

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