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A Bride’s Story

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 6)

Amir’s former tribe, the Halgals, have fallen upon hard times. They had needed to get Amir back to marry her to another tribe to expand their grazing lands. Because her new family wouldn’t give her up, they now have no new grazing land, and their livestock are suffering. Amir’s father, Berkhrat, strikes a bargain with their distant cousins, the Badan clan. They will attack the Eihon village and take their grazing lands for themselves. The Badan are in possession of guns and cannons they’ve purchased from the Russians, so it should be an easy fight. Amir’s older brother, Azel, is uneasy with the eagerness with which his father accepted the bargain, and is concerned for the life of his sister, as are their cousins Joruk and Baimat. When the time comes for battle, will these 3 young men follow their elders as they are expected to?

This volume is considerably faster-paced than the manga has been so far. Mori shows versatility with both her writing and drawing here. The small, intricate details are toned down in this volume, to showcase the speed and urgency of battle, though I never found it lacking in the signature atmosphere of the series. The layout and paneling are much tighter and follow a more traditional “comic book” format, to also highlight the action.

Though of course the writing is tighter and more action-oriented as well, we still are on a close, personal level with the characters. We experience the battle from more than one vantage point, allowing us to see the whole story, and see exactly what each character is experiencing. I’m impressed that she pulled off what is essentially a character study within a battle story. If I had any doubts about her writing ability before, I certainly don’t any longer!

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 6). 2014.

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A Bride’s Story (Vol. 5)

The twins, Leila and Leily, are finally getting married! There is so much to do and prepare: their wedding attire, the feast for the guests, and more! The day approaches, but as custom dictates, the brides cannot participate in any of the festivities. They’re instead expected to sit quietly and await their grooms. If they thought snagging husbands was hard, they’re in for a trial on their own wedding day! Of course, Mr. Smith is there, taking notes and asking questions on every aspect of the wedding festivities, but it will soon be time for him to resume his journey to Ankara. Amir has taken in an injured hawk and is trying to nurse it back to health. She worries it won’t be able to fly again, but Karluk is worried the hawk is getting more attention from his wife than he is! How does he navigate these feelings of jealousy?

So far, I haven’t minded that the series is in black and white – but man, with this volume, I really wish it was. The wedding festivities would have been amazing to see in color… I’m sure it would have been a riot of reds, yellows, and whites – cheerful colors. It is fun to imagine, don’t get me wrong ;D Mori’s drawing is so detailed and precise that I could almost smell the food being prepared. The art of this manga is so sensual and transports you to another place simply by looking at a panel.

I am glad we circled back to Amir and Karluk’s relationship in this volume. There is a beautiful chapter where Amir narrates a day – one day – in their life together, yet it feels like a snapshot of their whole married life thus far. Being engaged to be married myself… it hit a little hard. I feel like we’re digging a little more into the “meat” of the story here, with further character development, and the deepening of Amir and Karluk’s relationship. As ever, looking forward to the next volume!

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 5). 2013.

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 4)

We turn our focus back on Mr. Smith in this volume, as he and his guide continue on their road to Ankara. As they skirt the Aral Sea, they are led to a fishing village by a lively pair of twins named Laila and Leily. They are of an age to marry, but their father hasn’t gotten started on making them a match yet! Since they know the kind of men they want, they decide to take their nuptials into their own hands – which, more often than not, gets them into trouble! Meanwhile, Pariya’s father has met with the father of a boy that has taken an interest in her! Pariya is extremely nervous – she likes the boy as well, but won’t her forceful personality scare him away, just like all the others?

I cannot overstate it – I adore this manga. The illustrations are so lovingly detailed, and really ground you in the setting. The only thing I didn’t like about this volume were the introduction of the twins. Their comedic relief was a bit overdone for me. The leisurely pace is still a big draw for me. Even if I wish we would meander back to Amir and Karluk at some point, the journey is still worth it.

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 4). 2013.

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 3)

In this volume, we catch up with Mr. Smith! He is a researcher from England who was a guest in the Eihon household for a long time. He departed in Vol. 2 to continue his research about the people who live on the Silk Road. He meets a young woman named Talas at the market in the next town, where he is waiting for his guide. Their horses are stolen, and upon their recovery, she invites him to stay with her and her mother-in-law. Talas had been married previously – to every one of her mother-in-law’s sons. Her mother-in-law soon gets the idea that Talas and Mr. Smith should marry! But they don’t feel romantically towards each other – or do they?

Talas’ story reminded me of Draupadi, a character in the Indian epic Mahabharata, who married all five of the Pandava brothers. The circumstances that befall their husbands are equally tragic, though both women display a certain tenacity to weather troubled times. Mr. Smith is a great character; as he learns more about the land and people as an outsider, we do too. He acts almost as a lens! The characters in this volume are drawn tenderly, and you can’t help feeling for them. The art is so detailed, intricate, and vibrant – there is a scene where everyone is eating at the public market, and my mouth was watering from the imaginary smells!

I feel like I’ve reached a record with manga – 3 volumes in and I’m still as engaged with it as when I first started! Woo hoo! Looking forward to the next volume ❤

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 3). 2011.

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 2)

Things are good in the Eihon household. Amir has met a young woman named Pariya, an outspoken, accomplished baker, and the two become fast friends. Mr. Smith, a long-time guest of the household, has finally decided to move on to continue his research, resulting in a bittersweet parting. Amir and Karluk’s bond has deepened. However, Amir’s family has come to take her back. They were turned away by Karluk’s grandmother in the first volume, but they are back to take Amir by any means necessary. They insist Amir wasn’t the girl they intended to send to marry Karluk. The entire family – even the village – stands their ground to protect Amir. When it’s all over, how can Amir forgive, forget, and move on?

The first volume was mostly about Amir and Karluk’s relationship, but here we have multiple plot threads going for different characters. It added some much-needed plot and depth to the story. It’s really more of a study in the traditions and customs of the people as it is an actual story, but the leisurely pace is appealing to me at the moment. I’m happy to report the art in this volume was just as superb as the last! Looking forward to the art in the next volume too 😉

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 2). 2010.

A Bride’s Story (Vol. 1)

I mentioned in a previous post that I’m not really a fan of manga – mostly because I can’t finish a manga to save my life! But I think I may have finally found one here 😉

Amir is a young woman who has been sent to marry her betrothed and live with his family. She’s in for a surprise – Karluk, the young man, is eight years younger than she is! Amir cheerfully takes it in stride. Life in nineteenth century Asia isn’t easy, but the family gets by. They have strong bonds with one another, and Amir is quickly accepted and loved by the Eihon family as if she was one of their own. For twelve-year-old Karluk, it’s a little strange to be married to a woman who’s twenty, but Amir is optimistic, kind, and knows how to hunt and ride horseback. Their bond is something like brother and sister, but could it go deeper? However, Amir’s family wants to take her back… they say that Amir wasn’t the one they meant to send! How can the Eihon family possibly give up one of their own?

Atmosphere is the name of the game with this manga. The art is simply stunning. The amount of detail in the clothing, rugs, and landscapes is overwhelming – in the best way! I found myself stopping and lingering over one page for minutes at a time, multiple times. You’re transported to central Asia in the nineteenth century with ease. Just look at this panel of Amir and Karluk sitting together!

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Isn’t it beautiful? ❤

There are a few family members who make appearances, but there is thankfully a family tree in the back in case you get confused. All the characters, Amir most of all, are charming and absolutely lovable. I’d keep coming back for the art alone, but the characters sealed the deal for me. I can’t remember the last time I said this for a manga, but I am so looking forward to the next volume!!!

– Kathleen

Mori, Kaoru. A Bride’s Story (Vol. 1). 2009.

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